Available Now! Canon EOS-7D Mark II/100-400mm L IS II Versatility « Arthur Morris/BIRDS AS ART

Available Now! Canon EOS-7D Mark II/100-400mm L IS II Versatility

What’s Up?

Me. Early. I leave the hotel at 4:30am for my flights to Phoenix and San Luis Obispo. Yesterday was packing day. This blog post took 3+ hours to prepare and was published from the Orlando Courtyard Marriott at 3:45am.

BTW, good job! The 3000+ views streak is still alive with yesterday’s 3157.


bh-100-400ii

The 100-400II is back in stock at B&H. With its amazing close focus, it really is the most versatile intermediate telephoto lens ever and it’s great image stabilization system makes it eminently hand holdable. Even though the B&H website shows this as out of stock, they are in stock right now in limited quantities so order yours right now by clicking on the widget below. Many thanks for that.

Today’s Images

Today’s images were all made on the morning of March 6, 2015 with the hand held Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens. I used focal lengths ranging from 100-400mm to showcase the amazing versatility of the new 100-400 II. Do consider that I spent several hours that morning working with the 7D II with both the Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II and the Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II.

Your Fave?

Please leave a comment to let us know which of the eight images is your favorite and which one you think does not merit inclusion here. Either way or both, be sure to let us know why.


laughing-gull-with-pipefish-_y8a2016-fort-desoto-park-fl

This image was created at Fort DeSoto on the cloudy morning of March 6, 2015 with the hand held Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens (at 400mm) and the Canon EOS 7D Mark II. ISO 400. Evaluative metering +1 stop: 1/800 sec. at f/5.6. Cloudy WB.

65-point automatic Selection/AI Servo/Rear Focus AF as framed was active at the moment of exposure; the AF system activated three AF points across the birds’s breast obviously on the same plane as the bird’s eye which is right-on sharp. Click here to see the latest version of the Rear Focus Tutorial. Click on the image to see a larger version.

Image #1: Laughing Gull with Pipefish


white-ibis-feeding-in-surf-_y8a2323-fort-desoto-park-fl

This image was created at Fort DeSoto on the cloudy morning of March 6, 2015 with the hand held Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens (at 200mm) and the Canon EOS 7D Mark II. ISO 400. Evaluative metering +1 2/3 stops as framed: 1/2000 sec. at f/5.6 in Manual mode was a slight underexposure. Cloudy WB.

Center AF point/AI Servo Expand/Rear Focus AF as framed was active at the moment of exposure; the active AF point fell squarely on the top of the bird’s head. Click here to see the latest version of the Rear Focus Tutorial. Click on the image to see a larger version.

Image #2: White Ibis feeding in surf.


royal-tern-on-approach-_y8a2441-fort-desoto-park-fl

This image was created at Fort DeSoto on the cloudy morning of March 6, 2015 with the hand held Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens (at 400mm) and the Canon EOS 7D Mark II. ISO 400. Evaluative metering +2 1/3 stops off the white sky: 1/1600 sec. at f/5.0 in Manual mode. Cloudy WB.

Center AF point/AI Servo Expand/Rear Focus AF as framed was active at the moment of exposure; the active AF point just below the tip of the bird’s bill. Click here to see the latest version of the Rear Focus Tutorial. Click on the image to see a larger version.

Image #3: Royal Tern Incoming


great-egret-striking-_y8a2060-fort-desoto-park-fl

This image was created at Fort DeSoto on the cloudy morning of March 6, 2015 with the hand held Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens (at 300mm) and the Canon EOS 7D Mark II. ISO 400. Evaluative metering +1 1/3 stop as framed: 1/1000 sec. at f/5.6 was a very slight underexposure. Cloudy WB.

Zone AI Servo/Rear Focus AF as framed was active at the moment of exposure; the AF system activated two points below the center AF point that were on the reflection of the bird’s neck. Less than ideal but for the fact that the image is sharp. Click here to see the latest version of the Rear Focus Tutorial. Click on the image to see a larger version.

Image #4: Great Egret striking


great-egret-w-prey-item-_y8a1990-fort-desoto-park-fl

This image was created at Fort DeSoto on the cloudy morning of March 6, 2015 with the hand held Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens (at 400mm) and the Canon EOS 7D Mark II. ISO 400. Evaluative metering +1 2/3 stops set manually: 1/640 sec. at f/5.6. Cloudy WB.

Center AF point/AI Servo Expand/Rear Focus AF as framed was active at the moment of exposure; the active AF point fell on the bottom of the back of the bird’s head just before the neck. Click here to see the latest version of the Rear Focus Tutorial. Click on the image to see a larger version.

Image #5: Great Egret with prey/rear view


willet-flock-at-the-beach-_y8a2394-fort-desoto-park-fl

This image was created at Fort DeSoto on the cloudy morning of March 6, 2015 with the hand held Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens (at 100mm) and the Canon EOS 7D Mark II. ISO 800. Evaluative metering +1 2/3 stops as framed: 1/1600 sec. at f/5.6 Cloudy WB.

Center AF point/AI Servo Expand/Rear Focus AF on the nearest Willet and re-compose. Click here to see the latest version of the Rear Focus Tutorial. Click on the image to see a larger version.

Image #6: Willet flock at the beach

What three other species besides Homo sapiens are shown in this image?


ring-billed-gull-adult-_y8a2475-fort-desoto-park-fl

This image was created at Fort DeSoto on the cloudy morning of March 6, 2015 with the hand held Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens (at 182mm) and the Canon EOS 7D Mark II. ISO 400. Evaluative metering +1 1/3 stops: 1/1000 sec. at f/8. Cloudy WB.

Center AF point/AI Servo Expand/Rear Focus AF as framed was active at the moment of exposure; the active AF point fell right on the bird’s eye. Click here to see the latest version of the Rear Focus Tutorial. Click on the image to see a larger version.

Image #7: Ring-billed Gull/tight head portrait


royal-tern-curved-line-up-_y8a2455-fort-desoto-park-fl

This image was created at Fort DeSoto on the cloudy morning of March 6, 2015 with the hand held Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens (at 278mm) and the Canon EOS 7D Mark II. ISO 640. Evaluative metering +1 2/3 stops: 1/1600 sec. at f/5. Cloudy WB.

Center AF point/AI Servo Expand/Rear Focus AF on the front bird’s eye and re-compose. Click here to see the latest version of the Rear Focus Tutorial. Click on the image to see a larger version.

Image #8: Royal Terns sleeping line-up

As Predicted Here Previously…

As predicted here previously, the 7D II/100-400 II combination is revolutionizing bird photography. If you decide to join the fun and were inspired to purchase your rig as a result of what you have read here on the BAA blog, please consider supporting my efforts here by clicking on the widget below. Many thanks! artie


morro-bay-card-layers

Morro Bay offers a wealth of very attractive natural history subjects in a variety of attractive settings. Do consider joining me there on the March 20-22, 2015 Canon Destination Workshop. Complete info and register here

Morro Bay Pre-Canon Destination Workshop In-the-field Day

The Morro Bay Canon Destination Workshop March 20-22, 2015 now has only four slots open. To encourage folks to sign up I have planned the following:

Morro Bay Pre-Canon Destination Workshop In-the-field Day. Friday March 20: $399. Limit 8/Openings: 6

This in-the-field workshop includes a 4-hour morning photo-session that begins in the pre-dawn, a 2 hour afternoon photo session (3-5pm or so), and a working lunch with image review and some Photoshop. We will finish up in time to attend the Friday evening program that opens the Destination Workshop. At present only two folks are signed up for the day so you will surely receive all of the one on one guidance that you can handle.

Though you not need to be registered for the Canon event to join me on Friday, doing so would make a lot of sense to me. The Friday evening program is of course open only to those who are signed up for the Destination Workshop. See immediately below for details on that.

BIRDS AS ART Morro Bay, CA Canon Live Learning EOS Destination Workshop
March 20-22, 2015: $1050

Borrow great Canon gear. Head home with a print or two. Learn from the best.

Click here for complete info or to register.

Click here to see the course agenda.

Join me in one of the most beautiful and scenic places on the planet to photograph a large variety of birds of the sea and shore. The star of the show will be the spectacular Long-billed Curlew. There will be lots of Marbled Godwits and Willets as well as lots of the smaller shorebird species. Black Oystercatcher is likely and we should get to photograph large flocks of Western Sandpipers in flight over the bay; with any luck we should enjoy some great sunrise and sunset photography. There are lots of gulls including Western, California, and Mew. There is one good location where we should get to photograph Western, Clarke’s, Eared, and Pied-billed Grebe, Lesser Scaup, and Common Loon–you will be able to borrow a long lens from Canon along with various camera bodies. We may get to photograph some passerines including Anna’s Hummingbird, Brewer’s Blackbird, and White-crowned Sparrow. And we have a chance for several species of raptors. Yikes, I almost forgot California Poppy. And California Ground Squirrel. Sea Otters are also possible.

Folks who register after seeing this notice are asked to shoot me a copy of their BIRDS AS ART Morro Bay Registration Confirmation via e-mail.

See lots more Morro Bay images here.

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Typos

In all blog posts and Bulletins, feel free to e-mail or to leave a comment regarding any typos or errors. Just be right :).

9 comments to Available Now! Canon EOS-7D Mark II/100-400mm L IS II Versatility

  • avatar Pat Brown

    Typo, it’s Obispo. Love #4 with the splash and reflection of the bird, but particularly for the reflection of the splash and sheet of water under the neck.

    • avatar Arthur Morris/BIRDS AS ART

      Thanks and DUH n the brain typo. In this case and many others I know how to spell and pronounce a word but I am in too much of a hurry. IA.C. I appreciate all of the typo help. later and love, artie

  • avatar Jeffrey Friedhoffer

    Artie,
    Beautiful as always.
    The picture that does not fit is #6. At first did not see the birds for the people and bright colors.

    Re 3 species
    1. One or two Royal terns on far right

    2. Several dunlins in foreground about 1/3 way from the right

    3 possibly crabs on the beach in front of the flock

  • avatar Shane Shacaluga

    Hey Artie,

    Beautiful set of images. That combo is sure working well in your hands đŸ˜‰

    I am pondering between images #1 , #4 and #7 for various reasons but the white on white with the tack sharp eye of image 7 does it for me

    Have been contemplating the switch to canon recently and you are sort of pushing me over the edge haha

    Keep up the great work

    Shane

  • avatar Scott B

    I’m jealous at how tame these birds seem to be. 278mm on the Royal Terns sleeping is not that far away, even on a 1.6x crop body.

    I know I could always exercise more finesse in my approach, but I find myself using the 7D II, 100-400 II, and 1.4x TC III most of the time to get the birds sized in the frame like you do.

    This puts me at a huge disadvantage for auto-focusing options at 400mm (and forced f/8) with only one active sensor point. At the same time, I should be glad to have even one active point.

    AF button and back-button focus helps with composition, but I don’t always have the time to move my one AF point around with skittish birds here in New England.

    As always, your great work is making me take a step back and think, what more could I do with less?

    • avatar Arthur Morris/BIRDS AS ART

      Florida is Florida as far as tame birds go :). You can get AF Expand by pushing the grid button….. Are you on a tripod?
      Quit feeling sorry for yourself: I started with film and a 400mm manual focus lens way back when. And I lived in MY so I know about skittish birds đŸ™‚ artie

      • avatar Scott B

        Artie, thanks for the wake up slap. These are just the plights of a younger, more digital generation.

        I am not on a tripod, but will use the environment where I can for steadiness. It’s a piece of equipment that I need to purchase and get comfortable using. Price of entry to tripods that lay flat and mounts that swivel effortlessly seem as high as good glass. I’d have to save up for your BAA gear bag recommendations, but I’d be interested in a post of gear you started with and grew out of.

        Also, thanks for the AF Expand tip. I was out in Cape Cod/Provincetown this past week and didn’t trust myself purchasing your 7D II guide on an iPad. I’m sure it’s covered in the guide.

  • avatar Kathy Graff

    Really beautiful photos, Artie, as usual. My favorites are the Laughing Gull and the Ibis (the bubbles in the water add some texture and playfulness to the image). You’ve definitely proven over and over how good that Canon lens/body combination is.