Dealing with Bright Sun and Blue Skies, Part 1 « Arthur Morris/BIRDS AS ART

Dealing with Bright Sun and Blue Skies, Part 1

What’s Up

The hip is feeling better each day, and my black and blue and yellow and purple bruise keeps getting larger. We had a great 2nd morning on the 2nd Palouse IPT at a dijon mustard field in bloom. Talk about a win-win situation, the participants learned from and were inspired by the two leaders and the two leaders learned from and were inspired by the participants. This blog post, the 150th in a row, took about 1 1/2 hours to prepare. It was published just after midnight on Sunday, June 7.

Bosque IPTs Heating Up

Interest and registrations and for both Bosque IPTs continue to to increase. We signed up two folks for the 2nd IPT and the first, the 3-day is getting close to full. Scroll down for complete details.

Blue Sky Days

The first Palouse IPT was blessed with both cloudy bright days and skies full of huge puffy white clouds. Great for scenics, great for barns, great for infrared, great for everything Palouse. All day Friday and on Saturday morning of the second Palouse IPT we had cloudless blue skies. In the next few blog posts and probably beyond, I will share some of the techniques that we have been teaching so that folks can make some very good images on those clear sunny days….

Praying helps: as we headed out to one of our favorite locations on Saturday afternoon some nice clouds had built up in the west, just where we needed them.


barn-interior-_a1c9248-palouse-wa

This in-camera HDR Art Vivid HDR image was created on day 2 of the Palouse IPT with the (barely) tripod-mounted Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens (at 50mm) and the Canon EOS 5D Mark III. ISO 800. Adjusat dynamic range was set to Auto around a base exposure as follows: evaluative metering at 0: 1/50 sec. at f/4 in Av mode. WB: Auto.

Center AF point (Manual selection)/AI Servo/Rear Focus AF on the C.L Dechenne and Sons text and re-compose. Click here to see the latest version of the Rear Focus Tutorial. Click on the image to see a larger version.

Dealing With Bright Sun and Blue Skies, Part 1A

Rule #1: Find a subject in the shade

One of the easiest ways to find a subject in the shade in the Palouse is to–when it is safe to do so and you are not trespassing, go around sticking your head in the open or broken windows of dilapidated barns and houses. The results can at times be wondrous.


bosque-2014-a-card

In 2015, we are offering a 3-DAY IPT before Thanksgiving and a 4-DAY IPT after the holiday. You can attend either and spend Thanksgiving Day with your family. Sign up for both and we will be glad to apply a $100 discount to your balance. We know that there are lots of less costly workshops being offered these days. Many of them are downright cheap. Please remember that you get exactly what you pay for. With us you will have two full time pros there for you every minute we are in the field. Together they have more than 28 seasons of experience at the refuge. If you want the finest in photographic instruction and want to be assured of being in the right spot at exactly the right time every day, do join us.

Bosque del Apache 2015 BIRDS AS ART/A Creative Adventure Instructional Photo-Tour (IPT). 3-FULL DAY IPT: NOV 22-24, 2015. $1149. Two great leaders: Denise Ippolito and Arthur Morris. Meet and greet and introductory slide program after dinner on your own at 7:00pm on SAT NOV 21.

Tens of thousands of Snow Geese, 10,000 Sandhill Cranes, ducks, amazing sunrises, sunsets, and blast-offs. Live, eat, and breathe photography with two of the world’s premier photographic educators at one of their very favorite photography locations on the planet. Top-notch in-the-field and Photoshop instruction. This will make 21 consecutive Novembers at Bosque for artie. This will be denise’s 7th workshop at the refuge. Nobody knows the place better than artie does. Join us to learn to think like a pro, to recognize situations and to anticipate them based on the weather, especially the sky conditions, the light, and the wind direction. Every time we make a move we will let you know why. When you head home being able to apply what you’ve learned on your home turf will prove to be invaluable.

This workshop includes 3 morning and 3 afternoon photography sessions, an inspirational introductory slide program after dinner on your own on Saturday, 11/21, all lunches, and after-lunch digital workflow, Photoshop, and image critiquing sessions.

There is never a strict itinerary on a Bosque IPT as each day is tailored to the local conditions at the time and to the weather. We are totally flexible in order to maximize both the photographic and learning opportunities. We are up early each day leaving the hotel by 5:30 am to be in position for sunrise. We usually photograph until about 10:30am. Then it is back to Socorro for lunch and then a classroom session with the group most days. We head back to the refuge at about 3:30pm each day and photograph until sunset. We will be photographing lots of Snow Geese and lots of Sandhill Cranes with the emphasis on expanding both your technical skills and your creativity.

A $449 non-refundable deposit is required to hold your slot for this IPT. Your balance, payable only by check, will be due on 7/25/2015. If you cancel and the trip fills, we will be glad to apply a credit applicable to a future IPT for the full amount less a $100 processing fee. If we do not receive your check for the balance on or before the due date we will try to fill your spot from the waiting list. Whether or not your spot is filled, you will lose your deposit. If not, you can secure your spot by paying your balance.

Please print, complete, and sign the form that is linked to here and shoot it to us along with your deposit check (made out to “Arthur Morris.”) You can also leave your deposit with a credit card by calling the office at 863-692-0906. If you register by phone, please print, complete and sign the form as noted above and either mail it to us or e-mail the scan. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me via e-mail.


bosque-cardlarger

In 2015, we are offering a 3-DAY IPT before Thanksgiving and a 4-DAY IPT after the holiday. You can attend either and spend Thanksgiving Day with your family. Sign up for both and we will be glad to apply a $100 discount to your balance.

We know that there are lots of less costly workshops being offered these days. Please remember that you get exactly what you pay for. If you want the finest in photographic instruction and want to be assured of being in the right spot at exactly the right time, do join us.

Bosque del Apache 2015 BIRDS AS ART/A Creative Adventure Instructional Photo-Tour (IPT). 4-DAY IPT: (three full and two 1/2 DAYS) NOV 28-DEC 2, 2015. $1499. Two great leaders: Denise Ippolito and Arthur Morris. Meet and greet at 3pm on SAT NOV 28 followed by an afternoon photo session at the crane pools and the introductory slide program after dinner on your own.

Tens of thousands of Snow Geese, 10,000 Sandhill Cranes, ducks, amazing sunrises, sunsets, and blast-offs. Live, eat, and breathe photography with two of the world’s premier photographic educators at one of their very favorite photography locations on the planet. Top-notch in-the-field and Photoshop instruction. This will make 21 consecutive Novembers at Bosque for artie. This will be denise’s 7th workshop at the refuge. Nobody knows the place better than artie does. Join us to learn to think like a pro, to recognize situations and to anticipate them based on the weather, especially the sky conditions, the light, and the wind direction. Every time we make a move we will let you know why. When you head home being able to apply what you’ve learned on your home turf will prove to be invaluable.

This workshop includes 4 afternoon (11/28through 12/1), 4 morning (11/29 to 12/2) photography sessions, an inspirational introductory slide program after dinner on your own on Saturday, 11/28, all lunches, and after-lunch digital workflow, Photoshop, and image critiquing sessions.

There is never a strict itinerary on a Bosque IPT as each day is tailored to the local conditions at the time and to the weather. We are totally flexible in order to maximize both the photographic and learning opportunities. We are up early each day leaving the hotel by 5:30 am to be in position for sunrise. We usually photograph until about 10:30am. Then it is back to Socorro for lunch and then a classroom session with the group most days. We head back to the refuge at about 3:30pm each day and photograph until sunset. We will be photographing lots of Snow Geese and lots of Sandhill Cranes with the emphasis on expanding both your technical skills and your creativity.

A $599 non-refundable deposit is required to hold your slot for this IPT. Your balance, payable only by check, will be due on 7/25/2015. If you cancel and the trip fills, we will be glad to apply a credit applicable to a future IPT for the full amount less a $100 processing fee. If we do not receive your check for the balance on or before the due date we will try to fill your spot from the waiting list. Whether or not your spot is filled, you will lose your deposit. If not, you can secure your spot by paying your balance.

Please print, complete, and sign the form that is linked to here and shoot it to us along with your deposit check (made out to “Arthur Morris.”) You can also leave your deposit with a credit card by calling the office at 863-692-0906. If you register by phone, please print, complete and sign the form as noted above and either mail it to us or e-mail the scan. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me via e-mail.

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11 comments to Dealing with Bright Sun and Blue Skies, Part 1

  • In the first image, you say you have your 24-105 lens set to 500. Think you may mean 50?

  • avatar Jeff Sielski

    Hi Art, Glad to hear that you are feeling better, excellent image!

  • avatar David Policansky

    Artie: Wonderful image and piece of advice; thank you. Glad your hip is feeling better.

  • avatar Joe Subolefsky

    Artie your 24-105 must be a little different then mine if your shooting it at 500mm đŸ˜‰ Sounds like you guys are having a great time!

  • avatar Ruth Schueler

    I know I have no commented on the subject in question and I apologize.
    Ruthie

    • avatar David Peake

      Hi Ruth,
      Maybe it’s not today’s topic but the BAA blog is a gold mine of information. I recently started to follow the blog posts, around April 1st , a memorable post .i went back and started reading from jan 2014 . I have followed lots of the links. I have also watched several YouTube videos where Artie teaches on his passion of birds. You may have to hang out with him for a good while and you will learn so much. Including how to find and track fast moving birds, what sort of equipment you need and he also has links to great courses put together by other people who teach how to hand hold your camera and tracking birds etc.
      Can I encourage you to persevere with the blog and if you can do it attend one of the IPT s where you will have the chance to ask the questions in person.
      Artie is one of the best. An IPT would be a great investment in your photographic journey. All the best with your learning.
      Kind regards
      David Peake.

    • avatar David Policansky

      Martins and swifts are incredibly difficult to catch while flying, especially getting them large enough in the frame to make a good image. You properly asked Artie, the Master, but maybe this Grasshopper can offer some advice, which is to start with easier but still very rewarding birds like gulls. đŸ™‚ I agree with David Peake’s advice, attend an IPT. Bosque is perfect because after your IPT you can find birds for yourself, and the geese and cranes are manageable while in flight. But there are so many others….

  • avatar Ruth Schueler

    In all your blogs I have never found any advice about photographing fast flying birds like martins or swifts. I have tried to “catch” swifts when they were drinking while touching the surface of a pond. the results were very discouraging.
    I would be very grateful for some advice.
    Keep well
    Ruthie

    • When it comes to photographing small birds like that in flight, its pretty hard
      compared to the larger birds.

      My advice is to try and find one of their nests or feeding areas. Then just watch
      for a few minutes. After awhile you’ll start to notice a pattern on where they’re
      flying/landing.

      Then what I do is prefocus on that area and just wait. For example, lets say I find a
      hole in the tree where they are nesting. I’ll focus on that hole. Then when they approach,
      fire away. The hole will be in the shot, but that can be cropped out.

      Use the same technique for trying to catch them as they’re trying to touch the pond. Focus
      on the pond, make sure you have a fast shutter speed and fire away.

      What I do is while I’m watching in the viewfinder with one eye, I’m also watching for the action outside of the viewfinder with my other so I can see them coming in.

      Those are some of the techniques I use for photographing barn/tree swallows.

      Doug