A Huge, Important, and Pretty Consistent Perspective Mis-understanding … « Arthur Morris/BIRDS AS ART

A Huge, Important, and Pretty Consistent Perspective Mis-understanding ...

Stuff

Back at home, back in the office. It is 4:30pm and I am gonna get into the pool now. If you are seriously interested in a four-figure late registration discount on the puffin IPT please shoot me an e-mail.

Mongoose M3.6 Heads in Stock

For the first time in months, we have Mongoose M3.6 heads in stock. We got our hands on six the other day; three were already accounted for. Best advice: call Jim at 863-692-0906 to order.

2017 UK Puffins and Gannets IPT. Monday July 3 through Wednesday July 12, 2017: $5999 + $1499: Limit 10 photographers — Openings: 5). The (really cheap) two-day Gannet/Bass Rock Add-on is now part of the trip.

Right now I am offering a $1000 Late Registration Discount.

Here is some great info on the July 2017 UK Puffins and Gannets IPT: I have finalized the cottage and vehicle rental arrangements. We have room for several additional folks, at least for a couple and single. And I am in position, as noted above, to offer a rather substantial late registration discount. Please call us at 863-692-0906 or get in touch via e-mail. Click here and scroll down for additional details and the travel plans.

Just in case you have not been counting, today makes 8 days in a row with a new educational blog post 🙂




Gear Questions and Advice

Too many folks attending BAA IPTs and dozens of folks whom I see in the field, and on BPN, are–out of ignorance–using the wrong gear especially when it comes to tripods and more especially, tripod heads… Please know that I am always glad to answer your gear questions via e-mail.

Please Don’t Forget …

As always–and folks have been doing a really great job for a long time now–please remember to use the BAA B&H links for your major and minor gear purchases. For best results, use one of our many product-specific links; after clicking on one of those you can continue shopping with all subsequent purchases invisibly tracked to BAA. Your doing so is always greatly appreciated. Please remember: web orders only. And please remember also that if you are shopping for items that we carry in the BAA Online Store (as noted in red at the close of this post below) we would of course appreciate your business.

Selling Your Used Photo Gear Through BIRDS AS ART

Selling your used (or like-new) photo gear through the BAA Blog is a great idea. We charge only a 5% commission. One of the more popular used gear for sale sites charged a minimum of 20%. Plus assorted fees! Yikes. They went out of business. And e-Bay fees are now up to 13%. The minimum item price here is $500 (or less for a $25 fee). If you are interested please scroll down here or shoot us an e-mail with the words Items for Sale Info Request cut and pasted into the Subject line :). Stuff that is priced fairly — I offer pricing advice to those who agree to my terms — usually sells in no time flat. Over the past year, we have sold just about everything in sight. Do know that prices on some items like the EOS-1D Mark IV, the old Canon 500mm, the EOS-7D, and the original 400mm IS DO lens have been dropping steadily.

Used Gear Cautions

Though I am not in a position to post images of gear for sale here or elsewhere, prospective buyers are encouraged to request for photos of the gear that they are interested in purchasing via e-mail. Doing so will help to avoid any misunderstandings as to the condition of the gear. Sellers are advised to photograph their used gear with care against clean backgrounds so that the stuff is represented accurately and in the best light; please pardon the pun :).

Important Note for Sellers on Cashier’s Checks

Do understand that getting a cashier’s check for your gear is no guarantee of anything. You need to get the check to the bank asap. Years ago I “sold” an EOS 1D Mark III for $3,000 to a guy in California. I tried Fed Ex collect. The driver handed the camera to the guy. The guy handed him what appeared to be a Bank of North America teller’s check. When we brought the check to BONA they said, sorry, it’s phony. I followed up with the Lake Wales police. The got in touch with the police in the guy’s home town. They did nothing.

I was out 3,000 bucks. Getting a cashier’s check for your gear is no guarantee of anything.

Used Gear Sales Testimonials

Unsolicited via e-mail from Tom Phillips

Artie, Well, that was awesome for us all. Roger received the 300mm today and is happy, and James bought the 1Dx Mk II and the 400mm within minutes of it being listed on the first Saturday! I know you have a lot of readers and followers but your advice on pricing was right on to sell and also allowed me to get a good price, make the buyers happy, and make you some money too. I want to thank you very much! Tom

Unsolicited, via e-mail, from Gerry Keshka

Hi Artie, I wanted to share how much I appreciate your Used Gear “service.” You have posted how you help sellers, but the other side of the equations is how much this service helps buyers. I have purchased three lenses (Canon 200-400, 500 f4 II, and 70-200 F2.8) all lovely experiences and I saved almost $5K over retail. Each of the sellers was delightful, willing to help me assess if the purchase was right for me by sharing their experience with the lens. Each lens was in the condition advertised (or better), and typically included several “add-ons” that would have cost several hundred dollars.

Unsolicited, via e-mail, from Gerry Keshka

Hi Artie, I wanted to share how much I appreciate your Used Gear “service.” You have posted how you help sellers, but the other side of the equations is how much this service helps buyers. I have purchased three lenses (Canon 200-400, 500 f4 II, and 70-200 F2.8) all lovely experiences and I saved almost $5K over retail. Each of the sellers was delightful, willing to help me assess if the purchase was right for me by sharing their experience with the lens. Each lens was in the condition advertised (or better), and typically included several “add-ons” that would have cost several hundred dollars.

Thanks for all you do for the photographic community Artie. Gerry

Unsolicited, via e-mail, from Teresa Mabry Reed

Artie, Thanks for a positive experience in selling my used equipment. Best, Teresa

Unsolicited, via e-mail, from top BAA Used Gear seller Jim Keener

The BAA Used Gear Page is the best place I’ve found for selling my used cameras and lenses.

I used eBay and Craigslist until I began checking in at BIRDS AS ART. I saw the gear listed for sale at BAA and it struck me that the people who visit the site are like me in some important ways. We own high quality, often expensive gear. It’s important to us, and we likely take care of it. In other words, a good market exists. And I noticed how Artie marketed each item. Informative, without too big a push. That’s why I decided to try BAA.

The process was easy. I clearly accepted the terms of sale, fully and fairly described what I was selling and the good and bad. I listed he stuff to be included with in the sale. Then Artie came back with what he thought was a fair price, leaving it to me to determine the balance between urgency of the sale and receiving a high price. I’ve followed his lead.

The responses I’ve received from potential buyers have been reassuring. Each has been well informed and courteous. They have not expected perfection, but have fully expected fairness and clarity. I’ve found that providing many photographs of what I’m selling is very helpful in the completing the various transactions.

I’m writing this because of how glad I am to find a place where there is a good market for what I want to sell and what I want to buy — I just tried to buy a 300mm f/2.8 II, but it has sold. The buyers and sellers are informed and fair-minded. And artie offers friendly and experienced advice. I’ve enjoyed the process. The BAA Used Gear page is the best experience I’ve had buying and selling gear.

Unsolicited, via e-mail, from Owen Peller

I sold my 400 f/4 IS DO lens for the asking price. Thank you. Your service is truly better than any of the alternatives.

Artie, Thanks so much. I sent your check via my online banking. I never expected the 400 DO II and the 1DX II to sell within minutes of your posting the ad! I know that the 300 f/2.8 II is still up, but still, the results have been amazing. Another plus is that James McGrew is a professional artist and photographer and he was really looking and wanting that combo and is appreciative and excited to be able to find a great deal. Tom.

Newest Listings

Canon EOS 5D Mark III Body & Canon EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Lens

Multiple IPT veteran Brent Bridges is offering a used Canon EOS 5D Mark III body (with only 8,212 actuations) in near-mint condition but for a few very fine scratches on the LCD screens and a Canon EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM lens in excellent condition for the very low price of $1499. The sale includes the original product box, the instruction manual, the warranty card, the CDs, one battery and the charger, and insured ground shipping by major courier to US addresses only. Your item will not ship until your check clears unless other arrangements are made.

Please contact Brent by e-mail or by phone at 770-565-5012 (Eastern time).

I owned and used this superb, full frame, 22mp digital body for several years. It was always my first choice for scenic, Urbex, and flower photography until I fell in love for a while with the 5DS R (for a lot more money!). In addition, I loved my 5D III body for birds with my big lenses and both TCs. The 28-135 was the predecessor of the 24-105 and the 24-105 II. With Brent’s deal you are practically getting it for free. I used mine to create many saleable images. Brent has always taken fastidiously good care of his gear. artie

Canon EOS 7D Mark II Body

Multiple IPT veteran Brent Bridges is also offering a used Canon EOS 7D Mark II body in very good plus condition (with a small scratch on the top LCD) for the record-low BAA price of $839. The sale includes the original product box, the instruction manual, the warranty card, the CDs, and one battery and the charger. Your item will not ship until your check clears unless other arrangements are made.

Please contact Brent by e-mail or by phone at 770-565-5012 (Eastern time).

Both Patrick Sparkman and I used and loved the 7D Mark II until about two years ago when we both committed to using full frame Canon bodies. We both made some truly great images with it. Two of my three 2016 Nature’s Best honored entries were created with the 7D II, one still, and one video. It is surely the greatest value ever in a digital camera body … artie

Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM Lens with Extras!

Multiple IPT veteran Brent Bridges is also offering a used Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM lens (the old 1-4) in excellent condition along with the RRS B2-FABN 38mm Screw knob clamp with strap bosses and the RRS LCF-54 foot for only $599. The sale also includes the original product box, a LensCoat, a LensCoat Hoodie, the instruction manual, a warranty card, the tough, zippered carrying case, and insured ground shipping by major courier to US addresses only. Your item will not ship until your check clears unless other arrangements are made.

Please contact Brent by e-mail or by phone at 770-565-5012 (Eastern time).

The old 100-400 was and is a superb lens. I made hundreds of sale-able images with mine including the one used on the front cover of Scott Weidensaul’s “Return to Wild America”. Contrary to reports by the internet idiots the lens is -– in competent hands -– sharp at all focal lengths and it is sharp wide open as well. It is extremely versatile and would make a great starter lens for those interested in bird, wildlife, and general nature photography. artie

Canon EF Extender 1.4X III

Multiple IPT veteran Brent Bridges is also offering a used Canon EF Extender 1.4X III in near-mint condition for $329. The sale includes the original product box, the soft pouch carrying case, and insured ground shipping by major courier to US addresses only.

Please contact Brent by e-mail or by phone at 770-565-5012 (Eastern time).

As regular readers know, I consider both Series III TCs so important to my work that I travel with three 1.4X III TCs and two 2X III TCs. artie

Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports Lens for Canon EF

Multiple IPT veteran Brent Bridges is also offering a used Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports lens for Canon EF in near-mint condition for only $1199. The sale also includes the original product box, a LensCoat, the instruction manual, the lens strap & hood, and insured ground shipping by major courier to US addresses only. Your item will not ship until your check clears unless other arrangements are made.

Please contact Brent by e-mail or by phone at 770-565-5012 (Eastern time).

Lots of folks on recent IPTs have been using this relatively new Sigma lens with excellent results. artie

Sigma TC-1401 1.4x Teleconverter for Canon EF

Multiple IPT veteran Brent Bridges is also offering a used Sigma Sigma TC-1401 1.4x teleconverter for Canon EF in near-mint condition for a ridiculously low $129. The sale includes the original product box, and insured ground shipping by major courier to US addresses only. Your item will not ship until your check clears unless other arrangements are made.

Please contact Brent by e-mail or by phone at 770-565-5012 (Eastern time).

Induro CT 304

Multiple IPT veteran Brent Bridges is also offering a used Induro CT 304 carbon fiber tripod in mint condition for only $199. The sale includes the original product box, the zippered protective cover, and insured ground shipping by major courier to US addresses only. Your item will not ship until your check clears unless other arrangements are made.

Please contact Brent by e-mail or by phone at 770-565-5012 (Eastern time).

I used the Induro CT 304 carbon fiber tripod for more than a year before it was replaced by the GIT 304L that I use and love now. artie

American-Crow-_P3A0628-Carpinteria,-CA

This image was created on the morning of Friday June 16 on the beach at Carpinteria, CA with the hand held Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM lens, the Canon Extender EF 1.4X III, and my favorite bird photography camera, the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV. ISO 400. Evaluative metering +1/3 stop: 1/1000 sec. at f/6.3 in Manual mode. Daylight WB.

LensAlign/FocusTune micro-adjustment: -1.

Three AF points to the right of the center AF point/AI Servo/Expand/Shutter button AF was active at the moment of exposure as originally framed (should have been one of two AF points to the right of the center AF point; more on that tomorrow).

American Crow foraging

The Question …

In the American Crow Original Revealed blog post here, I wrote, “To create the American Crow image immediately above, I sat on the wet sand and used the knee-pod technique. Aside from getting wetter, would I have been better off getting flat on the ground? Why or why not?”

Three folks responded … Continue reading to learn something really important.

seated

Image #1: seated behind the lowered tripod

The Dark Strip Behind the Bird

Note that while seated behind my tripod, my line of sight put the dark strip right behind the bird. I did not notice that while photographing. Now, imagine yourself splaying the legs of your tripod and getting down flat. Study the diagram above; would the dark strip get higher in the frame or lower? Remember that the dark strip is actually flat on the ground. I angled it slightly when creating the diagram to add a bit or realism.

flat

Image #2: working flat on the ground …

Please note that I have exaggerated the angle of inclination to the subject here to better make my point. But don’t let that fool you! If you get lower the dark strip will also get lower.

A Huge But Pretty Consistent Perspective Mis-understanding …

Here are the three responses:

#1: Going lower would have raised the dark band of water behind the crow to the point where it might have intersected the head. To me that would have lessened the impact of the image by partially blending the head into the water.

#2: (If you got lower) the dark strip in the background would probably be higher in the frame.

#3: Getting lower would have changed it in that; the clear reflection of the legs (which I like) would have been lost, the dark blue band would be cutting through the bird’s head which would not be ideal (because it would be more distracting).

When I asked Jim at the office the “higher or lower” question, he responded immediately, “If you get lower the dark strip will rise.”

But the fact is that if you get lower the strip will get lower as well. He did not believe it so we set up two objects on the back of the sofa. When he stood he noted that the strip in the background went through the bird. When he bent his knees and got lower, he saw that the strip also got lower. He did not believe it at first 🙂

Understanding how distracting background elements move in relation to the subject when you change your perspective is of huge importance when you are in the field. If you too are confused by this situation you can practice in the field by changing your perspective and seeing what happens. Or you can set up some objects in your house and do the same thing.

The Conclusion

My answer is that had I been willing to lie down on the wet sand I would have created a much better image because the dark strip would have been moved down and would have been less obtrusive.






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To show your appreciation for my continuing efforts here, we ask, as always, that you get in the habit of using my B&H affiliate links on the right side of the blog for all of your photo and electronics purchases. Please check the availability of all photographic accessories in the New BIRDS AS ART Online Store, especially the Mongoose M3.6 tripod head, Wimberley lens plates, Delkin flash cards and accessories, and LensCoat stuff.

As always, we sell only what I have used, have tested, and can depend on. We will not sell you junk. We know what you need to make creating great images easy and fun. And please remember that I am always glad to answer your gear questions via e-mail.

I would of course appreciate your using our B&H affiliate links for all of your major gear, video, and electronic purchases. For the photographic stuff mentioned in the paragraph above, and for everything else in the new store, we, meaning BAA, would of course greatly appreciate your business. Here is a huge thank you to the many who have been using our links on a regular basis and those who will be visiting the New BIRDS AS ART Online Store as well.

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Typos

In all blog posts and Bulletins, feel free to e-mail or to leave a comment regarding any typos or errors. Just be right :).

13 comments to A Huge, Important, and Pretty Consistent Perspective Mis-understanding …

  • avatar David Peake

    Hi Artie. We had this discussion some time earlier in the blog when we were trying to decide if you moved left or right. Same misconception persisted then. took me a while to understand that the background with respect to the subject moves the same direction as the camera.
    thanks for the refresher on this.
    David.

    • avatar Arthur Morris/BIRDS AS ART

      Thanks David. I was thinking of you just yesterday. And yes, even I have it right this time 🙂

      with love, artie

  • avatar Jerry Turner

    One reason it seems confusing is that the more distant object isn’t the thing that is moving in relation to the viewer. It is the closer object that appears to move. Assume you are focusing on a distant horizon with a bird much closer. If you drop down and continue to focus on the horizon, the horizon stays fixed, but the bird appears to rise. If you now focus on the bird, the more distant object, in this case the horizon, appears to be have been lowered. It’s just a matter of which of the two objects you focus on.

  • Ooops! Thanks for clearing that one up, Artie. Very clear and useful lesson,
    Jake

  • avatar MikeH

    I think of this effect of perspective being like a see-saw with the subject (the crow’s head) being the pivot point and the line of sight is the plank of the see-saw.
    The dark stripe is behind the bird and is effectively where the plank (line of sight) touches the ground. If I drop my end of the plank (I get lower with my camera), the other end of the plank (the line of sight) rises above the stripe (the ground at the other end).

    Art’s graphic illustrates this nicely.

    If the dark patch had been a rock the same size as the bird (as KG Wuensch proposes) the same principle applies – at Art’s original position the rock may well have been a nice dark back drop and lying on the floor may well have had the edge of the rock instersecting the bird.

    • avatar Arthur Morris/BIRDS AS ART

      Hi MikeH,

      Thanks for your thoughtful reply. I agree but only 100%.

      with love, artie

      • avatar Arthur Morris/BIRDS AS ART

        ps to MikeH. I thought of creating a see-saw type diagram …

        with love, artie

    • Exactly what I was envisioning, the see-saw. Most folks think that the distracting element forms part of the see-saw, which precipitates their misconception that it’d move higher if you get lower. Great insight as always, wonderful learning 🙂

  • avatar K.G.Wuensch

    Hi,

    the thing why some might have misinterpreted the direction the dark patch would have moved is down to the pivot point of the optical axis and the relationship to this dark patch. Had the dark patch been a piece of decaying kelp or a rock rising to about head or breast height of the bird instead of a darker patch flat on the ground the pivoting of the optical axis by lowering the camera position would have had the effect the other commenters predicted. So it’s not as clear cut as you make it sound.

    If the distracting element is above the pivot point (here the birds head) then lowering the camera position will make the distracting element seemingly rise higher, if the distracting element is lower than the pivot point then lowering the camera position will also lower the distracting element.

    regards

    • avatar Arthur Morris/BIRDS AS ART

      Hi K.G. Thanks for your reply. The dark strip was obviously not a big rock else it would have taken up a lot more of the frame. And, no matter the size of the background object behind the bird getting lower to the subject will always move the background object effectively downwards …

      Folks are confused because they do not understand the perceptual concepts. Heck, with side to side movement of the lens I once screwed it up completely … The fact for side to side is that if the background object is behind the bird and you move to your right the object will move to the right …

      with love, artie

  • Awesome information in this one. Always learn a ton reading your blog.

  • avatar Stu

    Thank you very much for the helpful lesson on perspective!
    Best wishes.