Adding an External 1.4X TC to the Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Lens with Internal 1.4x Extender: 784mm! « Arthur Morris/BIRDS AS ART

Adding an External 1.4X TC to the Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Lens with Internal 1.4x Extender: 784mm!


great-frigatebird-chick-yawning-_q8r8500-darwin-bay-tower-island-galapagos

This Great Frigatebird chick was photographed with the tripod mounted Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Lens with Internal 1.4x Extender (with the internal TC in place), the Canon 1.4x EF Extender III (Teleconverter) (at 728mm), and the Canon EOS-1D X). ISO 800. Evaluative metering +1/3 stop in early morning light: 1/500 sec. at f/9.

Central sensor (by necessity)/AI Servo-Expand/Rear Focus AF on the bird’s face active at the moment of exposure. Click here if you missed the Rear Focus Tutorial. Click on the image to see a larger version.

Falling in Love with the Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Lens with Internal 1.4x Extender

When I woke on July 3rd, I could not decide whether to bring the 600 II, the new 200-400, or both. I finally decided to go with the 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Lens with Internal 1.4x Extender. As you saw in yesterday’s blog post, it turned out the be a great flight photography lens. Later on in what turned out to be a fabulous morning, I had many opportunities to add an external 1.4X TC with the internal extender in place. This yields an exceedingly sharp 392-784mm zoom lens that is ideal for small birds and tight close-ups of larger species.

nazca-booby-yawning-_q8r8819-darwin-bay-tower-island-galapagos

This image of a yawning adult Nazca Booby was created with the tripod mounted Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Lens with Internal 1.4x Extender (with the internal TC in place), the Canon 1.4x EF Extender III (Teleconverter) (at 728mm), and the Canon EOS-1D X). ISO 400. Evaluative metering at zero: 1/320 sec. at f/8.

Central sensor/AI Servo-Surround/Rear Focus AF on the base of the bird’s bill active at the moment of exposure. Click here if you missed the Rear Focus Tutorial. Click on the image to see a larger version.

Zooming Out for Perfect Framing

For both of the images above I was working at somewhat longer focal lengths when the subject yawned. I simply turned the zoom ring clockwise for a wider view to frame the image perfectly. This is huge advantage when compared to working with fixed focal length lenses where you often mis-frame the image when the subject yawns or stretches its neck.

large-billed-ground-finch-_q8r8871-darwin-bay-tower-island-galapagos

This immature large Ground Finch was photographed with the tripod-mounted Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM lens with Internal 1.4x Extender (with the internal TC in place), the Canon 1.4x EF Extender III (Teleconverter) (at 784mm, the maximum), and the Canon EOS-1D X). ISO 800. Evaluative metering +1 stop: 1/100 sec. at f/8 (wide open).

Central sensor/AI Servo-Surround/Rear Focus AF on the base of the bird’s very large beak and re-compose. Click here if you missed the Rear Focus Tutorial. Click on the image to see a larger version.

Your Favorite?

Please take a moment to leave a comment and let us know which of the four images is your favorite. And do let us know why. I have a first favorite and a second favorite and will share them with you somewhere down the line.

Bucket List?

If visiting the Galapagos is on your bucket list and you are a happy camper who is serious about joining us on our July 2015 trip, please shoot me an e-mail and ask to be placed on the interested list. There simply is no better Galapagos Photo Tour. There is lots of interest so far with many folks wish that we were going in 2014….

Inspired?

If reading the stuff on the new Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Lens with Internal 1.4x Extender has inspired you to purchase one please consider using our B&H affiliate link below as a thank you:

Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Lens with Internal 1.4x Extender

Typos

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8 comments to Adding an External 1.4X TC to the Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Lens with Internal 1.4x Extender: 784mm!

  • avatar Bill Richardson

    Dang, maybe the 200-400 should replace my 600mm? 2d one is my fav because I am evaluating the lens more than the subject itself and it shows a sharpness of subject and blured background at f8 that makes me want this lens.

  • avatar Phil Frigon

    To me the zoom would be 280-784mm not 392-784mm.

    • avatar Arthur Morris/BIRDS AS ART

      With the internal TC in place, the zoom range when you add an external 1.4X TC is indeed 392-784mm. With only the internal TC in place you have a 280-560 zoom range. And with the lens alone you have 200-400mm.

  • avatar Bob

    How do you find focusing at f8 or f9.

  • avatar Chris Wyatt

    My favorite is the Great Frigate Bird chick, second is the Nazca Booby. I like the chick for the catch light in the eye, the background color helps see the detail of the chick, and the “personality ” of the chick. I like the fact you left the feather on the Booby instead of removing it. I would like to see your opinions of the 200-400 with the external 1.4 tc in addition to the internal 1.4 tc compared to the 500 with a 1.4 tc. If you could have only 1 of the 2 options, which one would it be and why? I know the 200-400 combination is slower, but does the flexibility of the zoom make it a better choice?

  • The first one hands down. So clear. Great expression.

  • avatar James Saxon

    My favorite image is the Great Frigate Bird Chick. The expression, catchlight in the eye, complimentary background, the great amount of detail in the hair/feathers on the head, the small amount of color around the eye and mouth allow the image to “pop” and enhance the expression on the face. Really a great image.